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Madelon’s pick…

Madelon’s pick…
Madelon van Schie in front of a work by Emo Verkerk.

In this section we let a selection of art lovers – from occasional buyers to art professionals – talk about their perception of art and preferences: where do they want to see art? Where do they purchase art, and above all: from which artists do they buy? Below, an interview with Madelon van Schie – independent curator and working for Defares Collection and ProWinkoProArt.

What does art mean to you?

Art is like a source of energy to me. Art comforts, feeds, stimulates and challenges me. Dealing with art - and dealing with artists - is what drives me. Art makes me happy. And that's what it's all about.

Did you get an appreciation of art from your parents or did you have to find your own way?

Both my parents are true art lovers: we always went to museums and concerts, and on vacation we invariably visited all the churches and castles in the area. At the time I thought that was annoying, I preferred to play outside. Yet, somehow those forced visits have planted a seed, because at some point I was determined to study art history.


The Ressurection Plot, 2015, Pauline Curnier Jardin. Photo credits: Paula Court.

Where do you get your information about the ups and downs in the art world?

I get to know a lot of information via social media - in fact, it is the reason I am still on Facebook - and I regularly check websites like Artnews and Hyperallergic. I am also a subscriber to Metropolis M, I read Afterall, Hyperallergic and Terremoto. In addition, we have a subscription to The Art Newspaper.

Where do you prefer to look at art?

Of course, the most fun and exciting thing to do is visit an artist's studio, but I look everywhere. In addition to visiting galleries and museums, I invariably visit the Venice and São Paulo biennials and also rarely skip fairs such as Art Basel, ARCO Madrid and ARTBO in Bogotá.

How many times a year do you buy art?

About two to three times a year, depending on my budget and what I come across. I almost exclusively buy unique work. If concerns an editioned work, it’s a photograph.


Patilleras, 2018, Ana Navas

And where do you buy: in the gallery, at an art fair, at an auction or online?

All of the above, actually. At galleries, at fairs, directly from the artist and at auction.

Is it important that you and your partner always agree on a purchase?

No, that's not important. We are both art historians and working in the art world, but we have very different interests. We both think it would be a shame to compromise on art.

Is there a gallery with which you have a special relationship?

In the Netherlands I have a special relationship with tegenboschvanvreden. I recently put together an exhibition with work by Latin American artists. The owners Martin and Pietje and their director Joan are very enthusiastic and well introduced.

If you had an unlimited budget, from whom would you purchase a work?

The first name that comes to mind is Félix González-Torres. His minimal, clear language reaches that far. His work connects the autobiographical and intimate with the public and the corporate, it is political and, moreover, immensely poetic.


Beautiful Isle of Somewhere, 2016, Inge Meijer

Who are your favourite artists?

Ana Navas: because her work always surprises me and makes me smile. It is resourceful, playful and authentic. Earlier this year I bought an assemblage from her consisting of mats, 80’s jewelry and shoulder pads. Awesome! By the way, you can still see her work at tegenboschvanvreden until 5 October.

Pauline Curnier Jardin: because I love her feverish mania, her theatrical, absurd approaches to equally alienating subjects, almost always with a female figure in the lead.

Meiro Koizumi is an artist in whose work I’d like find out more about. I find it very intriguing how he portrays things like the collective memory of Japan, but also traumas and taboos.


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